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Self-Organization of Nanoscopic Building Blocks into Ordered Assemblies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Mark A. Horsch
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136
Christopher R. Iacovella
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136
Zhenli Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136
Sharon C. Glotzer*
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136
*
Corresponding author: sglotzer@umich.edu
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Abstract

We studied the self-assembly of nanoscopic building blocks comprised of polymer-tethered nanoparticles using computer simulation and predict that these building blocks can assemble into mono- and multi-layer sheets and shells. The simulations further demonstrate that for some nanoparticle geometries and tethered nanoparticle topologies, ideas from block copolymers, surfactants and liquid crystals can be used to predict the ordered morphologies attained via self- assembly and that for specific cases the morphologies are consistent with Israelachvili packing rules.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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