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Solid-State NMR and Resonance Raman Studies of Ultramarine Pigments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Eleonora Del Federico
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics and Science, Pratt Institute, 200 Willoughby Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11205
Wolfgang Schoefberger
Affiliation:
Chemistry Department, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York City, NY, 10003.
Rajeev Kumar
Affiliation:
Chemistry Department, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York City, NY, 10003.
Wen Ling
Affiliation:
Chemistry Department, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York City, NY, 10003.
Sofia M. Kapetanaki
Affiliation:
Chemistry Department, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York City, NY, 10003.
Johannes Schelvis
Affiliation:
Chemistry Department, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York City, NY, 10003.
Alexej Jerschow
Affiliation:
Chemistry Department, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York City, NY, 10003.
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Abstract

We report on a study of ultramarine pigments via Colorimetry, resonance Raman, and 27Al, 29Si solid-state NMR spectroscopy. NMR parameters are shown to correlate well with the intensities of Raman signals corresponding to the chromophores S3−. and S2−.. Further, a correlation is established between the colorimetric parameters L* (lightness) and C* (chromaticity) and the paramagnetic shift in NMR spectra for both 27Al and 29Si. The parameter h (hue) appeared not to vary over the range of paramagnetic host concentrations studied. Preliminary results on faded pigments in both acidic and basic media show that the concentration of diamagnetic guest molecules in the sodalite lattice rises, and some of the paramagnetic species are replaced.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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References

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