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Towards NEMS Fluid Sensors Based on Suspended Nanomaterials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Luis Angel Jauregui
Affiliation:
jauregui@purdue.edu, Purdue University, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
Hao Lu
Affiliation:
haolu@rice.edu, Rice University, Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, Houston, Texas, United States
Jun Lou
Affiliation:
jlou@rice.edu, Rice University, Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, Houston, Texas, United States
Yong Chen
Affiliation:
yongchen@purdue.edu, Purdue University, Department of Physics, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
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Abstract

Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) based on nanomaterials, especially NEMS resonators made of suspended nanowires, nanotubes or nanosheets have emerged as promising devices for many sensing applications. However, operation of such NEMS resonators in liquids is usually difficult due to strong viscous damping. Here we present our progress in developing NEMS devices based on suspended nanomaterials that can operate in liquids. We present our measurements performed on suspended metallic nanowires driven by AC currents in a magnetic field in liquids.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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References

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