Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-4v6tc Total loading time: 0.198 Render date: 2023-02-01T23:18:53.055Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Inoculation, isolation and identification of Tuber melanosporum from old and new oak hosts in Israel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 2000

Y. PINKAS
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
M. MAIMON
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
E. SHABI
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
S. ELISHA
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Y. SHMULEWICH
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
S. FREEMAN
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Get access

Abstract

Five local oak species, Quercus boissieri, Q. calliprinus, Q. cerris, Q. ithaburensis and Q. libani were identified as hosts of Tuber melanosporum, the black truffle of Perigord, following inoculation of roots. Q. cerris and Q. libani developed abundant mycorrhizal roots, similar to the amount found in roots of Q. pubescens, the traditional host of this mycorrhizal fungus. Roots of Q. ilex, Q. hartwissiana and Q. pedunculiflora, introduced species in Israel, were also heavily colonized by the mycorrhizal fungus. Mycorrhized hazel (Corylus avellana) roots, were also obtained by the same inoculation procedure. Recovery of T. melanosporum from roots of inoculated oak was improved when chloramphenicol was added to the isolation medium. Recovery varied between 14 and 54% for C. avellana and Q. calliprinus, respectively. Recovery was highest for the two local species, Q. calliprinus (54%) and Q. boissieri (50%), followed by Q. pubescens (44%) and Q. ilex (41%). Identification of the isolated fungi was conducted using arbitrarily-primed PCR. Identical band patterns were observed among AP-PCR-amplified DNA extracted from an authentic culture of the fungus, ascocarps (truffles) and cultures isolated from roots. In addition, AP-PCR was reliable for differentiating between representative isolates of T. melanosporum, T. magnatum, T. borchii, T. maculatum, T. dryophilum, T. macrosporum and T. uncinatum.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The British Mycological Society 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Inoculation, isolation and identification of Tuber melanosporum from old and new oak hosts in Israel
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Inoculation, isolation and identification of Tuber melanosporum from old and new oak hosts in Israel
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Inoculation, isolation and identification of Tuber melanosporum from old and new oak hosts in Israel
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *