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Lectins from mushrooms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 1998

HEXIANG WANG
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Present address: Hexiang Wang, Department of Microbiology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094, China.
TZI BUN NG
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemistry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
VINCENT E. C. OOI
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
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Abstract

This review summarizes existing information about mushroom lectins, with an emphasis on those from the following species which have been most extensively characterized including various Agaricus species, Amanita pantherina, Boletus satanas, Coprinus cinereus, Ganoderma lucidum, Flammulina velutipes, Grifola frondosa, Hericium erinaceum, Ischnoderma resinosum, Lactarius deterrimus, Laetiporus sulphureus, Tricholoma mongolicum and Volvariella volvacea. It is noted that the mushroom lectins exhibit a diversity of chemical characteristics. Some of them are monomeric, whereas others are dimeric, trimeric or tetrameric. Their molecular weights range from 12 to 190 kDa, and the sugar contents from 0 to 18%. Carbohydrate specificities involve mainly galactose, lactose and N-acetylgalactosamine. A small number of mushroom lectins are specific for fucose, raffinose, N-glycolyneuraminic acid and N-acetyl-d-lactosamine. Studies on immunomodulatory and antitumour/cytotoxic activities have been carried out on lectins from Agaricus bisporus, Boletus satanas, Flammulina velutipes, Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa, Tricholoma mongolicum and Volvariella volvacea.

Type
REVIEW
Copyright
The British Mycological Society 1998

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