Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-fmrbl Total loading time: 0.771 Render date: 2022-09-30T06:52:52.048Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Introduction to this Special Issue

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2000

STEPHAN OEPEN
Affiliation:
Computational Linguistics, Saarland University, Im Stadtwald, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany; e-mail: oe@coli.uni-sb.de
DAN FLICKINGER
Affiliation:
Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; e-mail: dan@csli.stanford.edu
HANS USZKOREIT
Affiliation:
Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz GmbH and Computational Linguistics, Saarland University, Stuhlsatzenhausweg 3, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany; e-mail: hansu@dfki.de
JUN-ICHI TSUJII
Affiliation:
Department of Information Science, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo and Language Engineering, University of Science and Technology in Manchester, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 Japan; e-mail: tsujii@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Abstract

This issue of Natural Language Engineering journal reports on recent achievements in the domain of HPSG-based parsing. Research groups at Saarbrücken, CSLI Stanford and the University of Tokyo have worked on grammar development and processing systems that allow the use of HPSG-based processing in practical application contexts. Much of the research reported here has been collaborative, and all of the work shares a commitment to producing comparable results on wide-coverage grammars with substantial test suites. The focus of this special issue is deliberately narrow, to allow detailed technical reports on the results obtained among the collaborating groups. Thus, the volume cannot aim at providing a complete survey on the current state of the field. This introduction summarizes the research background for the work reported in the issue, and puts the major new approaches and results into perspective. Relationships to similar efforts pursued elsewhere are included, along with a brief summary of the research and development efforts reflected in the volume, the joint reference grammar, and the common sets of reference data.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
2000 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
6
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Introduction to this Special Issue
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Introduction to this Special Issue
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Introduction to this Special Issue
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *