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Systematic construction of a versatile case system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 December 1997

KEN BARKER
Affiliation:
School of Information Technology and Engineering
Formerly of the Department of Computer Science
, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1N 6N5; e-mail: {kbarker, terry, szpak}@csi.uottawa.ca
TERRY COPECK
Affiliation:
School of Information Technology and Engineering
Formerly of the Department of Computer Science
, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1N 6N5; e-mail: {kbarker, terry, szpak}@csi.uottawa.ca
STAN SZPAKOWICZ
Affiliation:
School of Information Technology and Engineering
Formerly of the Department of Computer Science
, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1N 6N5; e-mail: {kbarker, terry, szpak}@csi.uottawa.ca
SYLVAIN DELISLE
Affiliation:
Département de mathématiques et d'informatique, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Québec, Canada, G9A 5H7; e-mail: Sylvain_Delisle@uqtr.uquebec.ca

Abstract

Case systems abound in natural language processing. Almost any attempt to recognize and uniformly represent relationships within a clause – a unit at the centre of any linguistic system that goes beyond word level statistics – must be based on semantic roles drawn from a small, closed set. The set of roles describing relationships between a verb and its arguments within a clause is a case system. What is required of such a case system? How does a natural language practitioner build a system that is complete and detailed yet practical and natural? This paper chronicles the construction of a case system from its origin in English marker words to its successful application in the analysis of English text.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1997 Cambridge University Press

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