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Tactical generation in a free constituent order language

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 1998

DILEK ZEYNEP HAKKANI
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Engineering and Information Science, Faculty of Engineering, Bilkent University, 06533 Bilkent, Ankara, Turkey; e-mail: {hakkani,ko}@cs.bilkent.edu.tr
KEMAL OFLAZER
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Engineering and Information Science, Faculty of Engineering, Bilkent University, 06533 Bilkent, Ankara, Turkey; e-mail: {hakkani,ko}@cs.bilkent.edu.tr

Abstract

This paper describes tactical generation in Turkish, a free constituent order language, in which the order of the constituents may change according to the information structure of the sentences to be generated. In the absence of any information regarding the information structure of a sentence (i.e. topic, focus, background, etc.), the constituents of the sentence obey a default order, but the order is almost freely changeable, depending on the constraints of the text flow or discourse. We have used a recursively structured finite state machine (much like a Recursive Transition Network (RTN)) for handling the changes in constituent order, implemented as a right-linear grammar backbone. Our implementation environment is the GenKit system, developed at Carnegie Mellon University, Center for Machine Translation. Morphological realization has been implemented using an external morphological analysis/generation component which performs concrete morpheme selection and handles morphographemic processes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1998 Cambridge University Press

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