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Commentary: Teach network science to teenagers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 September 2013

HEATHER A. HARRINGTON
Affiliation:
Division of Molecular Biosciences, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
MARIANO BEGUERISSE-DÍAZ
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
M. PUCK ROMBACH
Affiliation:
Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3LB, UK
LAURA M. KEATING
Affiliation:
Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3LB, UK
MASON A. PORTER
Affiliation:
Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3LB, UK and CABDyN Complexity Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 1HP, UK (e-mail: porterm@maths.ox.ac.uk)

Abstract

We discuss our outreach efforts to introduce school students to network science and explain why researchers who study networks should be involved in such outreach activities. We provide overviews of modules that we have designed for these efforts, comment on our successes and failures, and illustrate the potentially enormous impact of such outreach efforts.

Type
Article Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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