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Contemporary Practices of Extending Traditional Asian Instruments Using Technology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 June 2014

Jingyin He
Affiliation:
Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
Ajay Kapur
Affiliation:
California Institute of the Arts, Valenica, California, United States; Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
Dale A. Carnegie
Affiliation:
Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
Corresponding

Abstract

Ongoing development of audio and informational technology has had an impact on almost every aspect of the musical arts. Cultures and subcultures have cross-pollinated through the rapid exchange of information and have metamorphosed into new fields of technology-based art forms, one of which is the integration of technology in Asian ethnic musics. This article specifically focuses on the integration of technology with the traditional music of India, Indonesia, China, Japan and Korea. By reviewing the history of this metier, we explore the various applications of technology in traditional Asian music and its future.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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