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Embodied Aesthetics in Auditory Display

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2014

Stephen Roddy
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Rep. of Ireland
Dermot Furlong
Affiliation:
Music & Media Technologies, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Rep. of Ireland

Abstract

Aesthetics are gaining increasing recognition as an important topic in auditory display. This article looks to embodied cognition to provide an aesthetic framework for auditory display design. It calls for a serious rethinking of the relationship between aesthetics and meaning-making in order to tackle the mapping problem which has resulted from historically positivistic and disembodied approaches within the field. Arguments for an embodied aesthetic framework are presented. An early example is considered and suggestions for further research on the road to an embodied aesthetics are proposed. Finally a closing discussion considers the merits of this approach to solving the mapping problem and designing more intuitively meaningful auditory displays.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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