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instance: Soma-based multi-user interaction design for the telematic sonic arts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 December 2021

Lucy Strauss*
Affiliation:
1University of British Columbia,Vancouver, Canada.
Kivanç Tatar*
Affiliation:
2Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Sumalgy Nuro*
Affiliation:
3University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

Abstract

The telematic work instance is a performance for viola and dance that digitally connects performers in Vancouver and Cape Town. The network interface enables a violist and a dancer to simultaneously play multi-user digital music-dance instruments over the internet with music and dance. The composition, design and performance interaction of instance draw from acoustic multi-user instrument paradigms and music-dance interactions in the African performing arts to explore the idiosyncrasies of the telematic performance space. The iterative design process implements soma-based research methods to inspire sonic compositional material with the body and to explore the performers’ embodied experience of sonic aesthetics during their interaction.

Type
Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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