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Soundscape Composition and Field Recording as a Platform for Collaborative Creativity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 November 2011

Jason Freeman*
Affiliation:
School of Music, Georgia Institute of Technology, 840 McMillan Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0456, USA
Carl DiSalvo*
Affiliation:
School of Literature, Culture, and Communications, Georgia Institute of Technology, 85 Fifth Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0760, USA
Michael Nitsche*
Affiliation:
School of Literature, Culture, and Communications, Georgia Institute of Technology, 85 Fifth Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0760, USA
Stephen Garrett*
Affiliation:
School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, 85 Fifth Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0760, USA

Abstract

In this paper, the authors describe and discuss UrbanRemix, a platform consisting of mobile-device applications and web-based tools to facilitate collaborative field recording, sound exploration, and soundscape creation. Reflecting on its use at workshops, festivals and community events, they evaluate the project in terms of its ability to enable participants to engage with their aural environments and to uncover their own creativity in the process.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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