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Working with Electroacoustic Music in Rural Communities: The use of an interactive music system in the creative process in primary and secondary school education

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2019

Mario Alberto Duarte-García*
Affiliation:
ENES Morelia, The National Autonomous University of Mexico, Cubículo 19, Edificio de Gobierno. Antigua Carretera a Pátzcuaro 8701, Sin Nombre, Indeco la Huerta, 58190 Morelia, Mich., Mexico
Jorge Rodrigo Sigal-Sefchovich*
Affiliation:
ENES Morelia, The National Autonomous University of Mexico, Cubículo 19, Edificio de Gobierno. Antigua Carretera a Pátzcuaro 8701, Sin Nombre, Indeco la Huerta, 58190 Morelia, Mich., Mexico and 2 Mexican Centre for Music and Sonic Arts, CMMAS, Av Morelos Nte 485, Centro Histórico, 58000 Morelia, Mich., Mexico

Abstract

This article describes a project intended to promote access to electroacoustic music for children and teenagers aged 6 to 15 years in a socially and educationally disadvantaged rural community in Michoacán, Mexico. It explores an educational model of teaching, learning and creation of electroacoustic music through the use of music technology and pedagogy based on constructivism and Paulo Freire’s ideas on education as a practice of freedom. It provides a pedagogical reflection on the processes of learning and appreciation of this new music. The project includes the use of an interactive music system – implemented in MaxMSP using a mobile phone OSC app to control space and its interaction with timbre, pitch and duration – as an aid in the classroom and its implementation in an educational programme with a social impact. The research covered in this article could be taken into account to deliver new music education in rural communities with similar socioeconomic circumstances.

Type
Articles
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press, 2019 

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