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Dying to talk: Unsettling assumptions toward research with patients at the end of life

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2010

Kathleen McLoughlin*
Affiliation:
Milford Care Centre, Castletroy, Limerick, County Limerick, Ireland and Department of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland
*
Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Kathleen McLoughlin, Milford Care Centre, Castletroy, Limerick, Ireland. E-mail: kemcloughlin@gmail.com

Abstract

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Type
Essay/Personal Reflections
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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References

REFERENCES

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