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Evolution, domestication and neo-domestication of the genus Vigna

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 July 2014

Norihiko Tomooka*
Affiliation:
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Ken Naito
Affiliation:
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Akito Kaga
Affiliation:
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Hiroaki Sakai
Affiliation:
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Takehisa Isemura
Affiliation:
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Eri Ogiso-Tanaka
Affiliation:
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Kohtaro Iseki
Affiliation:
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Yu Takahashi
Affiliation:
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
*
* Corresponding author. E-mail: tomooka@affrc.go.jp

Abstract

In this paper, we discuss stress-adapted wild Vigna plants and several important Vigna crops. Seeds, young shoots and/or tubers of many wild Vigna species are edible and are eaten by people in some locations where they grow. We propose the concept of ‘neo-domestication’ of stress-adapted wild edible Vigna species. As the causative change of the mutation resulting in a domestication gene is usually ‘loss-of-function’ type, ‘neo-domestication’ could be achieved by conventional mutation breeding together with screening by TILLING. The ‘neo-crops’ could play an important role in areas unsuitable for growing other crops to increase world food production. We also propose that wild Vigna species can be ‘new model plant species’ for the genetic study of natural adaptation to stresses (e.g. salt, acid, alkali, drought, flood, pests and diseases). To facilitate this, the Vigna Genome Project has been initiated. In addition, sustainable cropping systems may be enhanced by analysis of the nitrogen-fixing systems of stress-adapted Vigna species. Stress-adapted symbiotic bacteria produce nodules on stress-adapted Vigna species. Therefore, analyses of the genetic diversity of symbiotic bacteria and the process of symbiosis under stress environments should be conducted.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © NIAB 2014 

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