Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-727vs Total loading time: 0.223 Render date: 2022-11-30T10:03:12.336Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

The Rise of Periodical Studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 October 2020

Extract

Within or alongside the larger field of print culture, a new area for scholarship is emerging in the humanities and the more humanistic social sciences: periodical studies. This development is being driven by the cultural turn in departments of language and literature, by the development of digital archives that allow for such studies on a broader scale than ever before, and by what the producers of the Spectator Project have called “the special capabilities of the digital environment” (Center). Literary and historical disciplines engaged with the study of modern culture are finding in periodicals both a new resource and a pressing challenge to existing paradigms for the investigation of Enlightenment, nineteenth-century, and modern cultures. The forms of this new engagement range from Cary Nelson's suggestion, in Repression and Recovery, that periodicals should be read as texts that have a unity different from but comparable with that of individual books (219) to the organization of groups like the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals, founded in 1968, and the more recently established Research Society for American Periodicals. Every year new books are appearing that emphasize peri–odicals and investigate the ways in which modern literature and the arts are connected to the culture of commerce and advertising and to the social, political, and scientific issues of the time.

Type
The Changing Profession
Copyright
Copyright © Modern Language Association of America, 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Works Cited

Annals of Tilley.” Editorial Desk. New York Times 6 Nov. 2005. New York Times on the Web. 25 Jan. 2006 <http://www.nytimes.com/>..>Google Scholar
Andrea L., BroomfieldInterdisciplinary Work and Periodicals Connections: An Issue in Honor of Sally H. Mitchell.” Victorian Periodicals Review 38 (2005): 129–40.Google Scholar
Center for Electronic Texts in the Humanities. “The Spectator Project: A Hypermedia Research Archive of Eighteenth-Century Periodicals.” The Spectator Project. 15 Feb. 2005. Rutgers U. 23 Jan. 2006 <http://tabula.rutgers.edu/spectator/project.html>..>Google Scholar
Bruce, Cole. “30 Million Pages to Go: Digitizing the American Newspaper.” Natl. Press Club. 16 Nov. 2004. National Endowment for the Humanities. 23 Jan. 2006 <http://www.neh.gov/whoweare/speeches/11162004.html>..>Google Scholar
Digital Imaging Project of South Africa. U of KwaZulu-Natal. 23 Jan. 2006 <http://aboutdisa.ukzn.ac.za/>..>Google Scholar
Friedland, LeeEllen, et al. “TEI Text Encoding in Libraries: Guidelines for Best Encoding Practices.” Vers. 1.0 (30 July 1999). Digital Library Federation. 29 July 2005. 25 Jan. 2006 <http://www.diglib.org/standards/tei.htm>..>Google Scholar
Hoffman, Frederick J., Charles Allen, and Carolyn F. Ulrich. The Little Magazine: A History and a Bibliography. 2nd ed. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1947.Google Scholar
Latham, Sean. “New Age Scholarship: The Work of Criticism in the Age of Digital Reproduction.” New Literary History 35 (2004): 411–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, Judith Yarros. “The Future of American Periodicals.” American Periodicals 15.2 (2005): 196201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McGann, Jerome. The Textual Condition. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1991.Google Scholar
Modernist Journals Project. Brown U; U of Tulsa. 25 Jan. 2006 <http://www.modjourn.brown.edu/>..>Google Scholar
Mott, Frank Luther. A History of American Magazines. 5 vols. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1938–68.Google Scholar
Nelson, Cary. Repression and Recovery: Modern American Poetry and the Politics of Cultural Memory, 19101945. Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1989.Google Scholar
Of All Things.” New Yorker 21 Feb. 1925: n.p.Google Scholar
Price, Leah. The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel: From Richardson to George Eliot. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
ProQuest, Information and Learning, . “ProQuest Creates Digital Archive of British Periodicals.” 28 Sept. 2005. ProQuest Information and Learning. 23 Jan. 2006 <http://www.il.proquest.com/pressroom/pressrelease/05/20050928B.shtml>..>Google Scholar
Topham, J.R. Science in the Nineteenth-Century Periodi-cal. 10 Feb. 2005. U of Leeds. 23 Jan. 2006 <http://www.sciper.leeds.ac.uk/>..>Google Scholar
Webby, Elizabeth. “Images of Europe in Two Nineteenth-Century Australian Illustrated Magazines.” Victorian Periodicals Review 37 (2004): 1024.Google Scholar
56
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Rise of Periodical Studies
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The Rise of Periodical Studies
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The Rise of Periodical Studies
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *