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Ivory gulls breeding on ice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 December 2009

David Boertmann
Affiliation:
National Environmental Research Institute, Aarhus University, P.O. Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark
Kent Olsen
Affiliation:
National Environmental Research Institute, Aarhus University, Kaloe, Grenaavej 12, Denmark
Oliver Gilg
Affiliation:
16 rue de Vernot. F-21440 Francheville/France

Abstract

A breeding colony of ivory gulls was discovered on an ice floe in northeast Greenland in August 2008. The ice floe resembled nearby islands in that it was covered with a thick layer of gravely moraine, and furthermore its position was fixed throughout most of the breeding season as the surrounding first year ice only broke up in mid August when most of the gull chicks had fledged.

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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References

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