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Article contents

Regional and indigenous identities in the high north: enacting social boundaries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2012

Sidsel Saugestad*
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology and Social Anthropology, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway (sidsel.saugestad@uit.no)

Abstract

This paper addresses two processes of social and cultural mobilisation. The first example is a regional movement, as manifested in social and cultural expressions of a north Norwegian identity that was particularly marked in the 1970s and early 80s. The other is the Saami movement, coming out strongly at about the same time, and being part of a global process of indigenous mobilisation. It is argued that although they are similar in the way they articulate a sense of identity and belonging in contrast to an overarching and encompassing state, they are different in their stated objectives, in their relation to the state and the type of achievements gained. The north Norwegian regional movement strived for inclusion into a wider national cultural tradition, and integration has been achieved by broadening the definition of what is considered Norwegian culture. The objective of the Saami movement was the opposite: to gain recognition as a people with a distinct culture, different from but equal in value with the Norwegian culture. The article is introduced by a theoretical discussion of the issues involved, framing the analysis of communicative strategies.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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