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    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Stone, Philip 2015. Geological exploration of South Atlantic islands and its contributions to the continental drift debate of the early 20th century. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association, Vol. 126, Issue. 2, p. 266.


    Dudeney, J.R. and Sheail, J. 2014. William Speirs Bruce and the Polar Medal: myth and reality. The Polar Journal, Vol. 4, Issue. 1, p. 170.


    Dudeney, John R. and Walton, David W.H. 2012. Leadership in politics and science within the Antarctic Treaty. Polar Research, Vol. 31,


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From Scotia to ‘Operation Tabarin’: developing British policy for Antarctica

  • John R. Dudeney (a1) and David W.H. Walton (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0032247411000520
  • Published online: 12 October 2011
Abstract
ABSTRACT

The roots of a British Antarctic policy can be traced, paradoxically, back to the establishment of a meteorological station by the Scottish Antarctic Expedition in the South Orkneys, in 1903, and the indifference of the British Government to its almost immediate transfer to the Argentine Government. It was from that modest physical presence upon Laurie Island that Argentina came increasingly to challenge British claims to the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands Dependencies (FID), first in the late 1920s and then more extensively in the second world war. This challenge shaped British policy for the next forty years, with further complications caused by overlapping territorial claims made by Chile and the possible territorial ambitions of the USA. Britain's eventual response, at the height of World War II, was to establish permanent occupation of Antarctica from the southern summer of 1943–1944. This occupation was given the military codename Operation Tabarin. However, it was never a military operation as such, although monitoring the activities of enemy surface raiders and submarines provided a convenient cover story, as did scientific research once the operation became public. Whilst successive parties, rich in professional scientists, considerably expanded the pre-war survey and research of the Discovery Investigations Committee, their physical occupancy of the Antarctic islands and Peninsula was essentially a political statement, whereby the Admiralty and Colonial Office (CO) strove to protect British territorial rights, whilst the Foreign Office (FO) endeavoured to minimise disruption to Britain's long-standing economic and cultural ties with Argentina, and most critically, the shipment of war-time meat supplies. In meeting that immediate need, Tabarin also provided the basis from which Britain's subsequent post-war leadership in Antarctic affairs developed.

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R.N.R. Brown 1939. Antarctic history: a reply to Professor Hobbs. Scottish Geographical Magazine 55: 170173.

W.H. Hobbs 1939. The discoveries of Antarctica within the American sector as revealed by maps and documents. Transactions of the American Philosophical Society 31:171.

N.A. Mackintosh 1950. The work of the Discovery Committee. Proceedings of the Royal Society Series A, 202: 116.

J.M. Wordie 1947. The FID Survey 1943–46. Polar Record 4: 372384.

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Polar Record
  • ISSN: 0032-2474
  • EISSN: 1475-3057
  • URL: /core/journals/polar-record
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