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Are Papers Written by Women Authors Cited Less Frequently?

  • Justin Esarey (a1) and Kristin Bryant (a2)
Abstract

Dion, Sumner, and Mitchell (2018) find that a published article is more likely to cite at least one female-authored paper if that article is itself authored by women. To complement their work, we study the number of times that an article in their data set is cited given that it has at least one female author. We find that articles with at least one female author are cited no more or less often than male-authored articles once we control for the publishing journal and the number of authors. The importance of controlling for author count in our model suggests that spurious correlation and/or self-citation might explain at least some of the gender differences found by Dion, Sumner, and Mitchell (2018).

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Footnotes
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Authors’ note: We thank Michelle Dion, Jane Lawrence Sumner, and Sara Mitchell for providing data, and for comments and suggestions they provided on an earlier draft of this paper. We also thank Liz Carlson for comments and suggestions that she provided on that earlier draft. A replication file for this paper is available at https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/PCYBPY.

Contributing Editor: Jeff Gill

Footnotes
References
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Political Analysis
  • ISSN: 1047-1987
  • EISSN: 1476-4989
  • URL: /core/journals/political-analysis
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Esarey and Bryant Dataset
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