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How Cross-Validation Can Go Wrong and What to Do About It

  • Marcel Neunhoeffer (a1) and Sebastian Sternberg (a1)
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Authors’ note: Replication materials are available online as a dataverse repository at https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/Y9KMJW (Neunhoeffer and Sternberg 2018). We thank Thomas Gschwend, Richard Traunmüller, Sean Carey, Sebastian Juhl, Verena Kunz, Guido Ropers, the participants of the CDSS Political Science colloquium and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments. All remaining errors are our own. This work was supported by the University of Mannheims Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences funded by the German Research Foundation.

Contributing Editor: Jeff Gill

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References

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Neunhoeffer, M., and Sternberg, S.. 2018 Replication data for: How cross-validation can go wrong and what to do about it. doi:10.7910/DVN/Y9KMJW, Harvard Dataverse, V1.
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Supplementary materials

Neunhoeffer and Sternberg supplementary material
Neunhoeffer and Sternberg supplementary material 1

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