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Where Does the President Stand? Measuring Presidential Ideology

  • Shawn Treier (a1)
Abstract

Although estimating the revealed preferences of members of Congress is straightforward, estimating the position of the president relative to Congress is not. Current estimates place the president as considerably more ideologically extreme than one would expect. These estimates, however, are very sensitive to the set of presidential positions used in the roll call analyses for the 103rd through 109th Congresses. The president often obtains more moderate ideal point estimates relative to Congress when including positions based on signing bills into law.

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e-mail: satreier@umn.edu (corresponding author)
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Author's note: I thank Tony Bertelli, Josh Clinton, Thomas Hammond, Michael Herron, David Nixon, Kevin Quinn, Jason Roberts, the participants of the University of Minnesota American Politics Proseminar, and several anonymous reviewers and the editors for their helpful feedback and suggestions. Initial research support provided by a Faculty Research Grant from the Office of the Vice President of Research at the University of Georgia. Earlier versions of this work were presented at the 2007 and 2008 annual meetings of the American Political Science Association and the 2008 annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Joshua D. Clinton , Simon Jackman , and Douglas Rivers . 2004. The statistical analysis of legislative roll call data. American Political Science Review 98: 355–70.

Joshua D. Clinton , Simon Jackman , and Douglas Rivers . 2004. The statistical analysis of legislative roll call data. American Political Science Review 98: 355–70.

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Keith T. Poole , and Howard Rosenthal . 1985. A spatial model for legislative roll call analysis. American Journal of Political Science 29: 357–84.

Keith T. Poole , and Howard Rosenthal . 1985. A spatial model for legislative roll call analysis. American Journal of Political Science 29: 357–84.

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Keith T. Poole , and Howard Rosenthal . 1991. Patterns of congressional voting. American Journal of Political Science 35: 228–78.

Jeffrey Segal . 1997. Separation-of-powers games in the positive theory of congress and courts. American Political Science Review 91 (March): 2844.

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Political Analysis
  • ISSN: 1047-1987
  • EISSN: 1476-4989
  • URL: /core/journals/political-analysis
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