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Three approaches to labor-market vulnerability and political preferences

  • Paul Marx (a1) and Georg Picot (a2)

Abstract

This contribution starts by presenting the three main approaches that political scientists use to analyze labor market vulnerability. We proceed to discuss various operationalizations of labor market vulnerability. We examine how they relate to the three theoretical approaches and we evaluate the consistency between theory and measurement. Finally, we recommend three measures that political scientists should deploy when analyzing the effect of labor market vulnerability on political preferences. We point out what each of these variables captures and what methodological challenges should be taken into account when using them.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author. E-mail: georg.picot@uib.no

References

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Keywords

Three approaches to labor-market vulnerability and political preferences

  • Paul Marx (a1) and Georg Picot (a2)

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