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Structure of [Pd(NH3)4]Cr2O7

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2013

Y. Laligant
Affiliation:
Laboratoire des Fluorures, CNRS URA 449, Université du Maine, Avenue O. Messiaen, 72017 Le Mans Cedex, France
A. Le Bail
Affiliation:
Laboratoire des Fluorures, CNRS URA 449, Université du Maine, Avenue O. Messiaen, 72017 Le Mans Cedex, France

Abstract

The structure of [Pd(NH3)4]Cr2O7 has been determined ab initio from conventional X-Ray powder diffraction data by the Patterson method. The cell is monoclinic (space group P21/c, Z = 4), with a = 7.771(3) Å, b=11.578(1) Å, c=11.852(4) Å, and β= 105.50(4)°. Refinements of 57 parameters by the Rietveld method, using 852 reflections lead to RB = 0.032, RP = 0.075, and Rwp = 0.092. The structure is built up from PdN4 square planes linked to Cr2O7 groups by hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen atoms could not be located.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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