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An empirical derivation of the X-ray optic transmission profile used in calibrating the Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry (PIXL) for Mars 2020

  • C. M. Heirwegh (a1), W. T. Elam (a2), D. T. Flannery (a1) and A. C. Allwood (a1)
Abstract

Calibration of the prototype Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry (PIXL) selected for Mars 2020 has commenced with an empirical derivation of the X-ray optic transmission profile. Through a straightforward method of dividing a measured “blank” spectrum over one calculated assuming no optic influence, a rudimentary profile was formed. A simple boxcar-smoothing algorithm was implemented to approximate the complete profile that was incorporated into PIQUANT. Use of this form of smoothing differs from the more conventional approach of using a parameter-based function to complete the profile. Comparison of element-specific correction factors, taken from a measurement of NIST SRM 610, was used to assess the accuracy of the new profile. Improvement in the low- to mid-energy portion of the data was apparent though the high-energy region diverged from unity, and thus, requires further refinement.

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      An empirical derivation of the X-ray optic transmission profile used in calibrating the Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry (PIXL) for Mars 2020
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Corresponding author
a)Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Electronic mail: christopher.m.heirwegh@jpl.nasa.gov
References
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Allwood, A. C., Wade, L., Clark, B., Elam, T., Flannery, D., Foote, M., Hurowitz, J., and Knowles, E. (2015) “Texture-specific elemental analysis of rocks and soils with PIXL: The Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry on Mars 2020,” Proceedings of IEEE Aerospace Conference 2015, Piscataway, New Jersey, March 7–14, 2015.
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Powder Diffraction
  • ISSN: 0885-7156
  • EISSN: 1945-7413
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