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Development and Evaluation of E-Learning Tool for Humanitarian Public Health Training

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 November 2022

Awsan Bahattab
Affiliation:
CRIMEDIM - Center for Research and Training in Disaster Medicine, Humanitarian Aid, and Global Health, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy
Omar Zain
Affiliation:
Public Health and Community Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Aden, Aden, Yemen
Monica Linty
Affiliation:
CRIMEDIM - Center for Research and Training in Disaster Medicine, Humanitarian Aid, and Global Health, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy
Ives Hubloue
Affiliation:
Research Group on Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussel, Belgium
Francesco Della Corte
Affiliation:
CRIMEDIM - Center for Research and Training in Disaster Medicine, Humanitarian Aid, and Global Health, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy
Luca Ragazzoni
Affiliation:
CRIMEDIM - Center for Research and Training in Disaster Medicine, Humanitarian Aid, and Global Health, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy
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Abstract

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Background/Introduction:

The humanitarian health field has grown rapidly in the last decades. However, education and training programs are still limited in number, especially where it is needed most. Additionally, the cost of the training is too expensive for local humanitarian health respondents. If developed appropriately, E-Learning can potentially address these gaps.

Objectives:

Develop an effective E-Learning tool for humanitarian public health training.

Method/Description:

The tool was developed using an institutional-based, action research method. Rapid prototyping - a modified analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (ADDIE) model - was used to identify the content and instructional design. This iterative process involved consultations and feedback from public health and disaster medicine instructors and students at different levels and training programs. Different methods were used to collect and analyze data, such as literature and courses reviews, observation, interviews, and questionnaires.

Results/Outcomes:

Four scenario-based E-Simulations - targeting entry-level humanitarian health professionals - were developed and piloted based on identified needs. Formative evaluation clarified training objectives and structure. Trainees were satisfied by the simulated scenario, interactivity, questions, and timely feedback. Poor internet was identified as a potential barrier to delivering the training in the humanitarian context.

Conclusion:

Clear objectives and quality content are the prerequisites for training effectiveness. Yet, instructional design is a critical element that can enhance training effectiveness. The tool’s offline mode is being adapted to improve access in poor internet connection settings. A summative evaluation will be conducted to measure the training’s effectiveness. Furthermore, successful factors in instructional design will be used to inform the development of advanced training in the field.

Type
Meeting Abstracts
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine