Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Disaster Planning for Homeless Populations: Analysis and Recommendations for Communities

  • Stephen C. Morris (a1)

Abstract

Homelessness is a growing problem, with perhaps greater than a 150 million homeless people globally. The global community has prioritized the problem, as eradicating homelessness is one of the United Nation’s sustainability goals of 2030. Homelessness is a variable entity with individual, population, cultural, and regional characteristics complicating emergency preparedness. Overall, there are many factors that make homeless individuals and populations more vulnerable to disasters. These include, but are not limited to: shelter concerns, transportation, acute and chronic financial and material resource constraints, mental and physical health concerns, violence, and substance abuse. As such, homeless population classification as a special or vulnerable population with regard to disaster planning is well-accepted. Much work has been done regarding best practices of accounting for and accommodating special populations in all aspects of disaster management. Utilizing what is understood of homeless populations and emergency management for special populations, a review of disaster planning with recommendations for communities was conducted. Much of the literature on this subject generates from urban homeless in the United States, but it is assumed that some lessons learned and guidance will be translatable to other communities and settings.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Disaster Planning for Homeless Populations: Analysis and Recommendations for Communities
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Disaster Planning for Homeless Populations: Analysis and Recommendations for Communities
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Disaster Planning for Homeless Populations: Analysis and Recommendations for Communities
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Stephen C. Morris, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and Public Health, University of Washington, 325 9th Avenue, Seattle, Washington98104USA, E-mails: scmorris@uw.edu; stephenmorrismd@gmail.com

References

Hide All
1.US Department of Housing and Urban Development. The 2018 Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) to Congress. https://files.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/2018-AHAR-Part-1.pdf. Accessed September 30, 2019.
2.Diament, M. More Than Two-Fifths of Homeless Have Disabilities. Disabilityscoop: The Premier Source for Developmental Disability News. July 2009. https://www.disabilityscoop.com/2009/07/16/homeless-report/4153/. Accessed September 30, 2019.
3.Federal Emergency Management Agency and 19 DHS Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Interim Emergency Management Planning Guide for Special Needs Populations. August 2008. http://www2.ku.edu/~rrtcpbs/resources/pdf/FEMA_CPG301.pdf. Accessed September 1, 2019.
4.Fazel, S, Geddes, JR, Kushel, M. The health of homeless people in high-income countries: descriptive epidemiology, health consequences, and clinical and policy recommendations. Lancet. 2014;384(9953):15291540.
5.Rimawi, BH, Mirdamadi, M, John, JF. Infections and homelessness: risks of increased infectious diseases in displaced women. World Medical & Health Policy. 2014;6(2):118132.
6.Baggett, TP, O’Connell, JJ, Singer, DE, Rigotti, NA. The unmet health care needs of homeless adults: a national study. Am J Public Health. 2010;100(7):13261333.
7.Canavan, R, Barry, MM, Matanov, A, et al.Service provision and barriers to care for homeless people with mental health problems across 14 European capital cities. BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:122.
8.Lam, CN, Arora, S, Menchine, M. Increased 30-day emergency department revisits among homeless patients with mental health conditions. West J Emerg Med. 2016;17(5):607612.
9.Fazel, S, Khosla, V, Doll, H, Geddes, J. The prevalence of mental disorders among the homeless in western countries: systematic review and meta-regression analysis. PLoS Med. 2008;5(12):e225.
10.Fischer, PJ, Breakey, WR. The epidemiology of alcohol, drug, and mental disorders among homeless persons. American Psychologist. 1991;46(11):11151128.
11.US Department of Housing and Urban Development. HUD Exchange: Disaster Recovery Homelessness Toolkit. https://www.hudexchange.info/news/disaster-recovery-homelessness-toolkit-recovery-guide-for-local-jurisdictions-now-available/. Accessed October 3, 2019.
12.Edgington, S. Disaster Planning for People Experiencing Homelessness National Health Care for the Homeless Council March 2009. http://www.nhchc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Disaster-Planning-for-People-Experiencing-Homelessness.pdf. Accessed September 30, 2019.
13.International Displacement Monitoring Centre. Global Disaster Displacement Risk - A Baseline for Future Work. Published October 2017. http://www.internal-displacement.org/publications/global-disaster-displacement-risk-a-baseline-for-future-work. Accessed September 30, 2019.
14.Levine, A. After a California Wildfire, New and Old Homeless Populations Collide. New York Times. Published December 3, 2018. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/03/us/california-fire-homeless.html. Accessed September 30, 2019.
15.Wexler, B, Smith, ME. Disaster response and people experiencing homelessness: addressing challenges of a population with limited resources. J Emerg Manage. 2015;13(3):195200.
16.Fogel, SJ. Reducing vulnerability for those who are homeless during natural disasters. Journal of Poverty. 2017;21(3):208226.
17.Gin, JL. Disaster preparedness in homeless residential organizations in Los Angeles County: identifying needs, assessing gaps. Natural Hazards Review. 2016;17(1).
18.US Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency. Guidance on Planning for Integration of Functional Needs Support Services in General Population Shelters. November 2010. https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/20130726-1831-25045-7316/fnss_guidance.pdf. Accessed September 30, 2019.
19.Kailes, J, Enders, A. Moving beyond ‘special needs:’ a function-based framework for emergency management planning. Journal of Disability Policy Studies. 2007;44:230237.
20.Plough, A, Fielding, JE, Chandra, A, et al.Building community disaster resilience: perspectives from a large urban county department of public health. Am J Public Health. 2013;103(7):11901197.
21.Health Resources and Service Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services. Health Center Emergency Management Program Expectations. Published 2007. https://bphc.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/bphc/about/pdf/pin200715.pdf. Accessed September 30, 2019.
22.Wineman, NV, Braun, BI, Barbera, JA, Loeb, JM. Assessing the integration of health center and community emergency preparedness and response planning. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2007;1(2):96105.
23.National Association of Social Workers. Certified Disaster Mental Health Responder. Online Course. https://www.nasw-md.org/page/112. Accessed September 30, 2019.
24.Public Health-Seattle and King County (WA) Vulnerable Populations Action Team (VPAT) Standards. https://www.kingcounty.gov/depts/health/emergency-preparedness/partnerships/Community-Resilience-Equity-Program/~/media/depts/health/emergency-preparedness/documents/VPAT-standards.ashx. Accessed September 30, 2019.
25.Klaiman, T. Locating and communicating with at-risk populations about emergency preparedness: the vulnerable populations outreach model. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2010;4(3):246251.
26.US Department of Housing and Urban Development. ESG Minimum Habitability Standards for Emergency Shelters and Permanent Housing. Resources and Assistant to Support HUD’s Community Partners. https://files.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/ESG-Emergency-Shelter-and-Permanent-Housing-Standards.pdf. Accessed September 30, 2019.

Keywords

Disaster Planning for Homeless Populations: Analysis and Recommendations for Communities

  • Stephen C. Morris (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.