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Capacity building and mentorship among pan-Canadian early career researchers in community-based primary health care

  • Kathryn Nicholson (a1), Rebecca Ganann (a2), Sue Bookey-Bassett (a3), Lisa Garland Baird (a4), Anna Garnett (a5), Zack Marshall (a6), Anum Irfan Khan (a7), Melissa Pirrie (a8), Maxime Sasseville (a9), Ali Ben Charif (a10) (a11), Marie-Ève Poitras (a12), Grace Kyoon-Achan (a13), Émilie Dionne (a14), Kasra Hassani (a15) and Moira Stewart (a16)...

Abstract

Aim:

To describe activities and outcomes of a cross-team capacity building strategy that took place over a five-year funding period within the broader context of 12 community-based primary health care (CBPHC) teams.

Background:

In 2013, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research funded 12 CBPHC Teams (12-Teams) to conduct innovative cross-jurisdictional research to improve the delivery of high-quality CBPHC to Canadians. This signature initiative also aimed to enhance CBPHC research capacity among an interdisciplinary group of trainees, facilitated by a collaboration between a capacity building committee led by senior researchers and a trainee-led working group.

Methods:

After the committee and working group were established, capacity building activities were organized based on needs and interests identified by trainees of the CBPHC Teams. This paper presents a summary of the activities accomplished, as well as the outcomes reported through an online semistructured survey completed by the trainees toward the end of the five-year funding period. This survey was designed to capture the capacity building and mentorship activities that trainees either had experienced or would like to experience in the future. Descriptive and thematic analyses were conducted based on survey responses, and these findings were compared with the existing core competencies in the literature.

Findings:

Since 2013, nine webinars and three online workshops were hosted by trainees and senior researchers, respectively. Many of the CBPHC Teams provided exposure for trainees to innovative methods, CBPHC content, and showcased trainee research. A total of 27 trainees from 10 of the 12-Teams responded to the survey (41.5%). Trainees identified key areas of benefit from their involvement in this initiative: skills training, networking opportunities, and academic productivity. Trainees identified gaps in research and professional skill development, indicating areas for further improvement in capacity building programs, particularly for trainees to play a more active role in their education and preparation.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Kathryn Nicholson, PhD, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada. E-mail: kathryn.nicholson@schulich.uwo.ca

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Keywords

Capacity building and mentorship among pan-Canadian early career researchers in community-based primary health care

  • Kathryn Nicholson (a1), Rebecca Ganann (a2), Sue Bookey-Bassett (a3), Lisa Garland Baird (a4), Anna Garnett (a5), Zack Marshall (a6), Anum Irfan Khan (a7), Melissa Pirrie (a8), Maxime Sasseville (a9), Ali Ben Charif (a10) (a11), Marie-Ève Poitras (a12), Grace Kyoon-Achan (a13), Émilie Dionne (a14), Kasra Hassani (a15) and Moira Stewart (a16)...

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