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AUTOMATED PART DECOMPOSITION FOR PRODUCT ARCHITECTURE MODELING

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2020

J. Redeker*
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany
P. Gebhardt
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany
A.-K. Reichler
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany
E. Türck
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany
K. Dröder
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany
T. Vietor
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany

Abstract

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This paper presents an algorithm that contributes to an automatic decomposition of a mechanical part based on geometric features and methods of unsupervised machine learning. For the development of the algorithm, existing techniques of 3D shape segmentation, especially surface-based part segmentation procedures are reviewed and important areas of activities are revealed. The developed multi-step approach results in an abstract product model. This representation leads to a new way of designing and redesigning parts for the novel hybrid manufacturing concept Incremental Manufacturing (IM).

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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