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AUTONOMOUS SHUTTLES FOR URBAN MOBILITY ON DEMAND APPLICATIONS – ECOSYSTEM DEPENDENT REQUIREMENT ELICITATION

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2020

A. Grahle
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
Y.-W. Song
Affiliation:
Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany
K. Brüske
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
B. Bender
Affiliation:
Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany
D. Göhlich
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
Corresponding

Abstract

Future transport will change drastically with the introduction of automated vehicles. Here, Autonomous Mobility on Demand (AMoD) will play a major role, requiring a radical change of vehicle design, with many different conceivable concepts. This technology shift holds high potentials and high risks. Uncertainties about future usage profiles, operator and customer requirements have to be dealt with. An approach to elicit initial requirements for future vehicle concepts considering the entire ecosystem is introduced. The applicability is shown for a specific urban mobility scenario.

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Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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