Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-q6bj7 Total loading time: 0.241 Render date: 2022-12-03T09:40:02.324Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

DESIGNING FOR SCIENCE CENTER EXHIBITIONS – A CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK FOR THE INTERACTION

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2020

J. Wideström*
Affiliation:
Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

While designing and discussing exhibitions in science centers, common conceptual framework is needed. This paper provides a framework based on participation, virtuality, and collaboration, and two models - a Rubik's cube model and a Scatter plot space. They are suitable tools for analysis and overview of existing and planned exhibitions, as well as for conceptual analysis during the design process. The classification and the models for the interaction have been developed in a research by design process, where 45 prototypes have been designed, exhibited and tested.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

References

Cuendet, S. et al. (2013), “Designing augmented reality for the classroom”, Computers & Education, Vol. 68, pp. 557569.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dourish, P. (2004), “What we talk about when we talk about context”, Personal and Ubiqut. Computing, Vol. 8, pp. 1930.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eriksson, E. (2011), “Spatial Explorations in Interaction Design”, Proceedings of Ambience’11 Conference.Google Scholar
Eriksson, E. and Wideström, J. (2014), “Staging the Interaction – Explorative Interventions for Engaging Citizens in the Development of Public Knowledge Institutions”, Proceedings of Design Research Society's Conference.Google Scholar
Eriksson, E. and Wideström, J. (2015), “The Virtual Culture House – Shaping the Identity of a Public Knowledge Institution”, Proceedings of The Value of Design Research Conference. Paris.Google Scholar
IDXPO (2019), Project website. [online] http://idxpo.se/Google Scholar
Karlén, J. (2017), “Learning with Digital Tools on Public Knowledge Institutions, A Literature Review based on Grounded Theory”, Göteborg University. Report, Vol. 2017 No. 106, pp. 36.Google Scholar
Koran, J., Longino, S. and Shafer, L. (1983), “A framework for conceptualizing research in natural history museums and science centers”, JRST, Vol. 20 No. 4, pp. 325339.Google Scholar
Liu, Y., Zhang, Q. (2019), “Interface Design Aesthetics of Interaction Design”. In: Design, User Experience, and Usability. Design Philosophy and Theory.Google Scholar
McCullough, M. (2004), Digital Ground: Architecture, Pervasive Computing, and Environmental Knowing, MIT Press Cambridge, MA. USA.Google Scholar
Ocampo-Agudelo, J., Maya, J. and Roldán, A. (2017), “A Tool for the Design of Experience-Centered Exhibits in Science Centers”, Science World Summit.Google Scholar
Rennie, L. and McClafferty, T. (1995), “Using visits to interactive science and technology centers, museums, aquaria, and zoos to promote learning in science”, J Sci Teacher Educ, Vol. 6, pp. 175185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sanders, E.B.-N. (2005), “Information, inspiration and co-creation”. The 6th International Conference of the European Academy of Design. Bremen, Germany.Google Scholar
Simeone, A.L., Velloso, E., and Gellersen, H. (2015), “Substitutional Reality: Using the Physical Environment to Design Virtual Reality Experiences”.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Simon, N. (2010), The Participatory Museum. [online] http://www.participatorymuseum.orgGoogle Scholar
Stappers, P.J. (2007), “Doing design as a part of doing research”. In: Michel, R. (Ed.), Design research now: essays and selected projects. Basel: Birkhäuser, pp. 8191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Universeum (2015), Versamhetsberättelse. Report 2015.Google Scholar
Ware, C. (2000), Information Visualization: Perception for design, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers.Google Scholar
Wideström, J. (2019), “The Transdisciplinary Nature of Virtual Space”, Book chapter in Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and Computer Graphics. AVR 2019, LNCS 11613, Springer Nature, Switzerland, pp. 186202.Google Scholar
You have Access Open access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

DESIGNING FOR SCIENCE CENTER EXHIBITIONS – A CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK FOR THE INTERACTION
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

DESIGNING FOR SCIENCE CENTER EXHIBITIONS – A CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK FOR THE INTERACTION
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

DESIGNING FOR SCIENCE CENTER EXHIBITIONS – A CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK FOR THE INTERACTION
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *