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DEVELOPMENT OF OPEN SOURCE HARDWARE IN ONLINE COMMUNITIES: INVESTIGATING REQUIREMENTS FOR GROUPWARE

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2020

R. Mies
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
J. Bonvoisin
Affiliation:
University of Bath, United Kingdom
R. Stark
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Open source hardware is hardware whose design is shared online so that anyone can study, modify, distribute, make, and sell it. In spite of the increasing popularity of this alternative IP management approach, the field of OSH remains fragmented of diverse practices seeking for settlement. This challenges providers of groupware solutions to capture the specific needs of open source product development practitioners. This contribution therefore delivers a list of basic requirements and verifies them by comparing offered functions of existing groupware solutions.

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Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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