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FROM CAD TO PHYSICS-BASED DIGITAL TWIN: FRAMEWORK FOR REAL-TIME SIMULATION OF VIRTUAL PROTOTYPES

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2020

J. G. Pereira
Affiliation:
Tampere University, Finland
A. Ellman*
Affiliation:
Tampere University, Finland

Abstract

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Engineering work is mostly done in 3D CAD software throughout the engineering process from conceptual design and layout of products. Physics-Based Virtual Prototypes are very valuable addition on Computer Aided Engineering enabling product development simulators, training simulators and digital twin concept in product lift-cycle process. In this work, we present a framework, how such virtual prototypes can be developed from 3D CAD models with meaningful effort.

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Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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FROM CAD TO PHYSICS-BASED DIGITAL TWIN: FRAMEWORK FOR REAL-TIME SIMULATION OF VIRTUAL PROTOTYPES
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