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USING A CROSS-DOMAIN PRODUCT MODEL TO SUPPORT ENGINEERING CHANGE MANAGEMENT

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2020

R. Wilms*
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany Volkswagen AG, Germany
P. Kronsbein
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany
D. Inkermann
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Clausthal, Germany
T. Huth
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany
M. Reik
Affiliation:
Volkswagen AG, Germany
T. Vietor
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany

Abstract

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Engineering changes (ECs) and engineering change management (ECM) are crucial for successful product design processes (PDP). Due to the increasing complexity of today's products (like vehicles) and the interaction of different engineering domains (mechanics, electric/electronics, software) involved in the PDP, cross-domain EC impact assessments as well as processes are required. To better support engineers in assessing change propagation across domains and products, existing approaches for ECM product models are analyzed in this paper and an enhanced product model is derived using MBSE.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

References

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