Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies – Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems

  • Edward F. Guinan (a1), Scott Engle (a1) and Edward J. Devinney (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

Current and planned telescope systems (both on the ground and in space) as well as new technologies will be discussed with emphasis on their impact on the studies of binary star and exoplanet systems. Although no telescopes or space missions are primarily designed to study binary stars (what a pity!), several are available (or will be shortly) to study exoplanet systems. Nonetheless those telescopes and instruments can also be powerful tools for studying binary and variable stars. For example, early microlensing missions (mid-1990s) such as EROS, MACHO and OGLE were initially designed for probing dark matter in the halos of galaxies but, serendipitously, these programs turned out to be a bonanza for the studies of eclipsing binaries and variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Galactic Bulge. A more recent example of this kind of serendipity is the Kepler Mission. Although Kepler was designed to discover exoplanet transits (and so far has been very successful, returning many planetary candidates), Kepler is turning out to be a “stealth” stellar astrophysics mission returning fundamentally important and new information on eclipsing binaries, variable stars and, in particular, providing a treasure trove of data of all types of pulsating stars suitable for detailed Asteroseismology studies. With this in mind, current and planned telescopes and networks, new instruments and techniques (including interferometers) are discussed that can play important roles in our understanding of both binary star and exoplanet systems. Recent advances in detectors (e.g. laser frequency comb spectrographs), telescope networks (both small and large – e.g. Super-WASP, HAT-net, RoboNet, Las Combres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network), wide field (panoramic) telescope systems (e.g. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and Pan-Starrs), huge telescopes (e.g. the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the Overwhelming Large Telescope (OWL) and the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT)), and space missions, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the possible NASA Explorer Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS – recently approved for further study) and Gaia (due for launch during 2013) will all be discussed. Also highlighted are advances in interferometers (both on the ground and from space) and imaging now possible at sub-millimeter wavelengths from the Extremely Long Array (ELVA) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). High precision Doppler spectroscopy, for example with HARPS, HIRES and more recently the Carnegie Planet Finder Spectrograph, are currently returning RVs typically better than ~2-m/s for some brighter exoplanet systems. But soon it should be possible to measure Doppler shifts as small as ~10-cm/s – sufficiently sensitive for detecting Earth-size planets. Also briefly discussed is the impact these instruments will have on the study of eclipsing binaries, along with future possibilities of utilizing methods from the emerging field of Astroinformatics, including: the Virtual Observatory (VO) and the possibilities of analyzing these huge datasets using Neural Network (NN) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies – Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies – Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies – Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All
Bloemen S., Marsh T. R., Östensen R. H., et al. , 2011, MNRAS, 410, 1787
Borne K., Accomazzi A., Bloom J., et al. , 2009, astro2010: The Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, 2010, 6P
Borucki W. J., et al. , 2011, arXiv:1112.1640
Burkart J., Quataert E., Arras P., & Weinberg N. N. 2011, arXiv:1108.3822
Groot P. J. 2011, arXiv:1104.3428
Guinan E. F. 1993, New Frontiers in Binary Star Research, 38, 1
Hallett P. E. 1987, J. Optical Soc. America A, 4, 2330
Huber K. F., Czesla S., Wolter U., & Schmitt J. H. M. M., 2010, A&A, 514, A39
Kipping D. M. 2009, MNRAS, 392, 181
Kloppenborg B., Stencel R., Monnier J. D., et al. , 2010, Nature, 464, 870
Loeb A. & Gaudi B. S. 2003, ApJL, 588, L117
Murphy M. T., Udem T., Holzwarth R., et al. , 2007, MNRAS, 380, 839
Osterman S., Diddams S., Quinlan F., et al. , 2011, BAAS, 43, #401.02
Santapaga T., Guinan E. F., Ballouz R., Engle S. G., & Dewarf L. 2011, BAAS, 43, #343.12
Schwarzenberg-Czerny A., Weiss W., et al. , 2010, 38th COSPAR Scientific Assembly, 38, 2904
Seager S. 2010, Exoplanet Atmospheres: Physical Processes. By Seager Sara. Princeton University Press, 2010. ISBN: 978-1-4008-3530-0.
Steinmetz T., Wilken T., Araujo-Hauck C., et al. , 2008, Science, 321, 1335
Vilardell F., Ribas I., Jordi C., Fitzpatrick E. L., & Guinan E. F. 2010, A&A, 509, A70
Welsh W. F., Orosz J. A., Aerts C., et al. , 2011, ApJS, 197, 4
Zucker S., Mazeh T., & Alexander T. 2007, ApJ, 670, 1326
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union
  • ISSN: 1743-9213
  • EISSN: 1743-9221
  • URL: /core/journals/proceedings-of-the-international-astronomical-union
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 32 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 75 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 19th October 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.