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Close binary evolution and blue straggler formation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 2008

P. Lu.
Affiliation:
National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012, P.R. China email: lupin@bao.ac.cn Graduate University of ChineseAcademy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, P.R. China
L. Deng
Affiliation:
National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012, P.R. China email: lupin@bao.ac.cn
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Abstract

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In order to discuss the contribution of mass transfer in primordial close binaries to the blue straggler population in young clusters, we use Eggleton's stellar evolution code to simulate a grid of case A binary evolutionary models with the initial donor mass 2.0 – 8.0 M and mass ratio 0.1 – 0.9. The models cover the whole case A binaries that will experience mass transfer between 30.0 Myr to 1.0 Gyr. Based on such detailed models, we present a simulation to compare with the HST observation of young cluster NGC 1831 which can be fit with an isochrone of log(age) = 8.65. The results show very few blue stragglers could be produced by case A binary evolution. There must be some other mechanisms for blue straggler formation in young clusters.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2008

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