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Cold Dust and its Heating Sources in M 33

  • Shinya Komugi (a1) (a2), Tomoka Tosaki (a3), Kotaro Kohno (a4) (a5), Takashi Tsukagoshi (a4), Yoichi Tamura (a4), Rie Miura (a6), Sachiko Onodera (a7), Nario Kuno (a7), Ryohei Kawabe (a7), Koichiro Nakanishi (a2), Tsuyoshi Sawada (a1) (a2), Hajime Ezawa (a2), Grant W. Wilson (a8), Min S. Yun (a8), Kimberly S. Scott (a9), David H. Hughes (a10), Itziar Aretxaga (a10), Thushara A. Perera (a11), Jason E. Austermann (a12), Kunihiko Tanaka (a13), Kazuyuki Muraoka (a14) and Fumi Egusa (a15)...

Abstract

We have mapped the nearby face-on spiral galaxy M 33 in the 1.1 mm dust continuum using AzTEC on Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). The preliminary results are presented here. The observed dust has a characteristic temperature of ~ 21 K in the central kpc, radially declining down to ~ 13 K at the edge of the star forming disk. We compare the dust temperatures with KS band flux and star formation tracers. Our results imply that cold dust heating may be driven by long-lived stars even nearby star forming regions.

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References

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