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The Diversity of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2010

Jade C. Bond
Affiliation:
Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E Fort Lowell Rd, Tucson AZ 85719 email: jbond@psi.edu
Dante S. Lauretta
Affiliation:
Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson AZ 85721
David P. O'Brien
Affiliation:
Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E Fort Lowell Rd, Tucson AZ 85719 email: jbond@psi.edu
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Abstract

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Extrasolar planetary host stars are enriched in key planet-building elements. These enrichments have the potential to drastically alter the building blocks available for terrestrial planet formation. Here we report on the combination of dynamical models of late-stage terrestrial planet formation within known extrasolar planetary systems with chemical equilibrium models of the composition of solid material within the disk. This allows us to constrain the bulk elemental composition of extrasolar terrestrial planets. A wide variety of resulting planetary compositions exist, ranging from those that are essentially “Earth-like”, containing metallic Fe and Mg-silicates, to those that are dominated by graphite and SiC. This implies that a diverse range of terrestrial planets are likely to exist within extrasolar planetary systems.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2010

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