Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-k7p5g Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-12T22:22:16.873Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Properties of barred galaxies in the MaNGA galaxy survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2020

Amelia Fraser-McKelvie
Affiliation:
School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, U.K. email: amelia.fraser-mckelvie@nottingham.ac.uk
Michael Merrifield
Affiliation:
School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, U.K. email: amelia.fraser-mckelvie@nottingham.ac.uk
Alfonso Aragón-Salamanca
Affiliation:
School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, U.K. email: amelia.fraser-mckelvie@nottingham.ac.uk
Karen Masters
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Haverford College, 370 Lancaster Ave, Haverford, PA19041, U.S.A.
Rights & Permissions [Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Core share and HTML view are not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

We present the initial results of a census of 684 barred galaxies in the MaNGA galaxy survey. This large sample contains galaxies with a wide range of physical properties, and we attempt to link bar properties to key observables for the whole galaxy. We find the length of the bar, when normalised for galaxy size, is correlated with the distance of the galaxy from the star formation main sequence, with more passive galaxies hosting larger-scale bars. Ionised gas is observed along the bars of low-mass galaxies only, and these galaxies are generally star-forming and host short bars. Higher-mass galaxies do not contain Hα emission along their bars, however, but are more likely to host rings or Hα at the centre and ends of the bar. Our results suggest that different physical processes are at play in the formation and evolution of bars in low- and high-mass galaxies.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2020

References

Athanassoula, E., Machado, R. E. G., Rodionov, S. A., et al. 2013, MNRAS, 429, 3, 194910.1093/mnras/sts452CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blanton, M. R., Kazin, E., Muna, D., et al. 2011 AJ, 142, 3110.1088/0004-6256/142/1/31CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bundy, K., Bershady, M. A., Law, D. R.et al. 2015 ApJ, 798, 710.1088/0004-637X/798/1/7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Catinella, B., Schiminovich, D., Kauffmann, G., et al. 2010, MNRAS, 403, 2, 68310.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.16180.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cluver, M. E., Jarrett, T. H., & Dale, D. A. 2017, ApJ, 850, 1, 6810.3847/1538-4357/aa92c7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davies, L. J. M., Driver, S. P., Robotham, A. S. G., et al. 2016 MNRAS, 461, 1, 45810.1093/mnras/stw1342CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kraljic, K., Bournaud, F., & Martig, M. 2012, ApJ, 757, 1, 6010.1088/0004-637X/757/1/60CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Verley, S., Combes, F., Verdes-Montenegro, L., et al. 2007 A&A, 474, 1, 43Google Scholar
Westfall, K. B., Cappellari, M., Bershady, M. A.et al.submitted to AJGoogle Scholar
Willett, K. W., Lintott, C. J., Bamford, S. P., et al. 2013 MNRAS, 435, 283510.1093/mnras/stt1458CrossRefGoogle Scholar