Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-bntjx Total loading time: 0.178 Render date: 2021-05-14T08:42:32.472Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Synthetic activity indicators for M-type dwarf stars

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 September 2016

Sven Wedemeyer
Affiliation:
Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, Postboks 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo, Norway email: sven.wedemeyer@astro.uio.no
Hans-Günter Ludwig
Affiliation:
ZAH-Landessternwarte, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany email: hludwig@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Here, we present a set of time-dependent 3D RMHD simulations of a M-dwarf star representative of AD Leo, which extend from the upper convection zone into the chromosphere. The 3D model atmospheres are characterized by a very dynamic and intermittent structure on small spatial and temporal scales and a wealth of physical processes, which by nature cannot be described by means of 1D static model atmospheres. Artificial observations of these models imply that a combination of complementary diagnostics such as Ca II lines and the continuum intensity from UV to millimeter wavelengths, probe various properties of the dynamics, thermal and magnetic structure of the photosphere and the chromosphere and thus provide measures of stellar activity, which can be compared to observations. The complicated magnetic field structure and its imprint in synthetic diagnostics may have important implications for the understanding and characterization of stellar activity and with it possibly for the evaluation of planetary habitability around active M-dwarf stars.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2016 

References

Bochanski, J. J., Hawley, S. L., Covey, K. R., et al. 2010, AJ, 139, 2679 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlsson, M. 1986, Uppsala Astronomical Observatory: Report No. 33Google Scholar
Clyne, J., Mininni, P., Norton, A., & Rast, M. 2007, New J. Phys, 9 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dorch, S. B. F. & Ludwig, H.-G. 2002, Astronomische Nachrichten, 323, 402 3.0.CO;2-H>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dumusque, X., Glenday, A., Phillips, D. F., et al. 2015, ArXiv e-prints 151102267DGoogle Scholar
Freytag, B. & Höfner, S. 2008, A&A, 483, 571 Google Scholar
Freytag, B., Steffen, M., Ludwig, H.-G., et al. 2012, Journal of Computational Physics, 231, 919 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hallinan, G., Antonova, A., Doyle, J. G., et al. 2008, ApJ, 684, 644 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hawley, S. L. & Pettersen, B. R. 1991, ApJ, 378, 725 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kowalski, A., Hawley, S., Holtzman, J., Wisniewski, J., & Hilton, E. 2010, ApJL, 714, L98 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liseau, R., Vlemmings, W., Bayo, A., et al. 2015, A&A, 573, L4 Google Scholar
Ludwig, H., Allard, F., & Hauschildt, P. H. 2002, A&A, 395, 99 Google Scholar
Osten, R. A., Godet, O., Drake, S., et al. 2010, ApJ, 721, 785 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reiners, A. & Basri, G. 2009, ApJ, 705, 1416 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reiners, A. & Basri, G. 2010, ApJ, 710, 924 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmidt, S. J., Prieto, J. L., Stanek, K. Z., et al. 2014, ApJL, 781, L24 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steffen, M., Freytag, B., & Ludwig, H.-G. 2005, in ESA Special Publication, Vol. 560, ed. F. Favata, G. A. J. Hussain, & B. Battrick, 985Google Scholar
Tremblay, P.-E., Fontaine, G., Freytag, B., et al. 2015, ApJ, 812, 19 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wedemeyer, S., Ludwig, H.-G., & Steiner, O. 2013, Astronomische Nachrichten, 334, 137 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wedemeyer-Böhm, S., Lagg, A. & Nordlund, Å. 2009, Space Sci. Rev., 144, 317 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wedemeyer-Böhm, S., Ludwig, H. G., Steffen, M., Leenaarts, J., & Freytag, B. 2007, A&A, 471, 977 Google Scholar
Wende, S., Reiners, A., & Ludwig, H. 2009, A&A, 508, 1429 Google Scholar
Wootten, A. & Thompson, A. R. 2009, IEEE Proceedings, 97, 1463 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Synthetic activity indicators for M-type dwarf stars
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Synthetic activity indicators for M-type dwarf stars
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Synthetic activity indicators for M-type dwarf stars
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *