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New Approach on the Allocation of Wear Allowances - A Case Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019


Dominik Schubert
Affiliation:
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institute of Polymer Technology;
Andreas Rohrmoser
Affiliation:
Friedrich- Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institute of Manufacturing Technology;
Sebastian Hertle
Affiliation:
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institute of Polymer Technology;
Sandro Wartzack
Affiliation:
Friedrich- Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Engineering Design
Hinnerk Hagenah
Affiliation:
Friedrich- Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institute of Manufacturing Technology;
Marion Merklein
Affiliation:
Friedrich- Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institute of Manufacturing Technology;
Dietmar Drummer
Affiliation:
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institute of Polymer Technology;
Corresponding


Abstract

To maintain functional tolerances of gear sets over their lifetime, especially in polymer-seel gear sets, the wear behaviour must be considered. The state of the art in wear modelling does not take the run-in behaviour of polymer-metal contacts into account. This results in oversizing of wear allowances in the stationary wear phase and undersizing in the run-in phase. Therefore, a modified wear model is presented in this paper. With this method the issues of over- and undersizing can be eliminated.

The method is then applied in a case study to show two things. Firstly, using the presented method the calculated necessary wear allowances were reduced by 30%. Secondly, the effect of surface structures on the wear behaviour was investigated. It is shown that the run-in process is not dependent on roughness in sliding direction, but on overall contact area. Thus, the state of the art, i.e. tolerating only the roughness in sliding direction, is insufficient. Considering the process-induced surface topology during design of gear sets can decrease run-in wear. Together with the optimised wear model, this allows wider manufacturing tolerances and thus lower costs during production.


Type
Article
Creative Commons
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019

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