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Acute in-patient psychiatry: the right time for a new specialty?

  • Luiz Dratcu (a1)
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Abstract
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Dratcu, L., Grandison, A. & Adkin, A. (2003) Acute hospital care in inner London: splitting from mentalhealth services in the community. Psychiatric Bulletin, 27, 8386.
Krogstad, U., Hofoss, D. & Hjortdahl, P. (2002) Continuity of hospital care: beyond the question of personal contact. BMJ, 324, 3638.
Marshall, H., Lelliott, P. & Hill, K. (2004) Safer Wards for Acute Psychiatry. London: National Patient Safety Agency. http://www.npsa.nhs.uk/site/media/documents/1241_SWAP_ResearchReport.pdf
National Institute for Clinical Excellence (2002) Implementing NICE Guidance on the Use of (Newer) Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs for the Treatment of Schizophrenia. London: NICE.
Shorter, E. (1997) A History of Psychiatry. From the Era of the Asylum to the Age of Prozac. Chichester: John Wiley.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Acute in-patient psychiatry: the right time for a new specialty?

  • Luiz Dratcu (a1)
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eLetters

Acute Inpatient Psychiatry: From an SHO�s perspective

Farhana R Sarker, Senior House Officer,Old Age Psychiatry
16 January 2007

I am an SHO working within Old Age Psychiatry. I have the opportunityto work under one consultant whose role is geared towards inpatients and the other towards outpatients during the same duration.

From discussing with the staff they find it more transparent as they have a single point of contact as opposed to three teams with three consultants. The management of beds has become more defined hence there isless struggle to obtain beds between teams. The staff are also relieved as there are fewer meetings per week compared to before. These are all interlinked with the fact that there is nowone consultant who is in charge of all management issues.

From the other professional point of view, like occupational therapists, social workers, they find it of more convenience that they nowalso have one point of contact.

There were three consultants in charge of the three Community Mental Health Teams so there were differing views when a patient was considered for admission to a ward. This may be for example that the same patient mayhave gone through more than one team. With the new system the Teams already working together and have a good understanding, there is hardly any clash or major change in patient management now when the same patient is admitted on to the ward. This is again because the decision is made at one point, the consultant for the inpatient. This minimizes the disruptionof the continuity of the care for the patient.

From the consultant's view they are solely dedicated either towards the inpatient or the outpatient role. There is hence more clarity on the actions that they take and the management they want to pursue.

There are pros and cons in this system, which have already been acknowledged from further discussions that have taken place in comparison to others systems which are in consideration. From an SHO's point of view the splitting of role of consultant between inpatient and outpatient has enhanced the care of patients in this part of the country, especially in Old Age Psychiatry.
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Conflict of interest: None Declared

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