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Acute wards: problems and solutions: Alternatives to acute wards: users' perspectives

  • Peter Relton (a1) and Phil Thomas (a2)
Extract

The move from institutional to community care in the second half of the twentieth century arose in a climate in which civil rights became increasingly prominent, and out of which the modern survivor movement grew (Campbell, 1996). Government policy for mental health services, as set out in Standard Five of the National Service Framework (NSF; Department of Health, 1999), requires that care should be provided in hospital, or an alternative in the least restrictive environment, and as close to home as possible. At the same time, Government policy also attaches increasing importance to the involvement of service users and carers in the planning, delivery and evaluation of services. This paper examines alternatives to hospital care from a user perspective. The problem is that the evidence base for the NSF largely consists of quantitative studies designed to answer questions of concern to mental health professionals. This tells us little about the perspectives of the service user, which is the strength and value of user-led research (Faulkner & Thomas, 2002). Much of what follows is taken from this area, but in addition we describe briefly our own experience of home treatment, which the NSF sets out as one of the main alternatives to in-patient care.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Audit Commission (1994) Finding a Place: A Review of Mental Health Services for Adults. London: HMSO.
Campbell, P. (1996) The history of the user movement in the United Kingdom. In Mental Health Matters: A Reader (eds Heller, T., Reynolds, J., Gomm, R., et al). Basingstoke: Macmillan.
Cohen, B. (1999) Evaluation of the Bradford Home Treatment Service. Bradford: Department of Social and Economic Studies, University of Bradford.
Dace, E. (2001) Something Inside so Strong: Strategies for Surviving Mental Distress (eds Read, J. & Faulkner, A.). London: Mental Health Foundation.
Department of Health (1999) A National Service Framework for Mental Health. London: Department of Health.
Faulkner, A. (1997) Knowing our Own Minds: A Survey of How People in Emotional Distress Take Control of their Own Lives. London: Mental Health Foundation.
Faulkner, A. & Thomas, P. (2002) User-led research and evidence-based medicine. British Journal of Psychiatry, 180, 13.
Rose, D. (2001) Users' Voices: The Perspectives of Mental Health Service Users on Community and Hospital Care. London: The Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Acute wards: problems and solutions: Alternatives to acute wards: users' perspectives

  • Peter Relton (a1) and Phil Thomas (a2)
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