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Children with learning disabilities and related needs placed out of borough: parents' perspective

  • Amma Shuwa (a1), Brian Fitzgerald (a2), Carmen Clemente (a3) and Denny Grant (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

To investigate parental experience of children with learning disability being placed out of borough. The parents of 70 children were interviewed.

Results

Parents would prefer in-borough provision but 90% were satisfied with the current school. The main problems experienced in-borough were poor advice, delays, lack of information and family stress. After out-of-borough placement there was a reported increase in the use of speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and sensory facilities and a decrease in the use of paediatric services, social services, and mental health services.

Clinical Implications

Specialist services should be helpful and reduce family burden by keeping children in-borough.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Audit Commission (1994) Seen but not Heard. London: Stationery Office.
Beresford, B. (1995) Expert Opinions: A National Survey of Parents Caring for a Severely Disabled Child. Bristol: Policy Press.
Chamba, R., Ahmad, W., Hirst, M., et al (1999) On the Edge: Minority Ethnic Families Caring for a Severely Disabled Child. Bristol: Policy Press.
Department of Health (2001) Valuing People: A New Strategy for Learning Disability for the 21st Century. London: Department of Health. http://www.archive.official-documents.co.uk/document/cm50/5086
Enfield, S. L. & Tonge, B. J. (1996a) Population prevalence of psychopathology in children and adolescents with intellectual disability: I. Rationale and methods. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 40, 9198.
Enfield, S. L. & Tonge, B. J. (1996b) Population prevalence of psychopathology in children and adolescents with intellectual disability: II. Epidemiological findings. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 40, 99109.
Mental Health Foundation (1997) Don't Forget Us: Children with Learning Disabilities and Severe Challenging Behaviour. London: Mental Health Foundation.
Royal College of Psychiatrists (2004) Psychiatric Services for Children and Adolescents with Learning Disability. Council Report, CR123. http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/publications/cr/council/cr123.pdf
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Children with learning disabilities and related needs placed out of borough: parents' perspective

  • Amma Shuwa (a1), Brian Fitzgerald (a2), Carmen Clemente (a3) and Denny Grant (a3)
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