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Consultant psychiatrists' working patterns: is a progressive approach the key to staff retention?

  • Alex Mears (a1), Sarah Pajak (a2), Tim Kendall (a2), Cornelius Katona (a3), Jibby Medina (a2), Peter Huxley (a4), Sherrill Evans and Claire Gately (a5)...
Abstract
Aims and Method

The aim of the study was to explore how different styles of working relate to measures of occupational pressure experienced by consultant psychiatrists. A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 500 consultant psychiatrists enquiring about work patterns, roles and responsibilities; it also contained validated tools, including the 12-item General Health Questionnaire.

Results

A total of 185 usable questionnaires were returned; an adjusted response rate of 41%. More ‘progressive’ styles of working were found to be linked with less occupational pressure on consultant psychiatrists. Three scales were derived: positive workload pattern, clarity of role and perceived support.

Clinical Implications

Alterations in working style may be helpful in combating occupational stress, and therefore in reducing attrition in the psychiatric workforce. Consultants and their teams should give consideration to reviewing their roles and patterns of working.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Goldberg, D. (1992) General Health Questionnaire (GHQ–12). Windsor: NFER–Nelson.
Karasek, R., Brisson, C., Kawakami, N., et al (1998) The job content questionnaire (JCQ): an instrument for internationally comparative assessments of psychological job characteristics. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 3, 322355.
Kennedy, P. & Griffiths, H. (2001) General psychiatrists discovering new roles for a new era … and removing work stress (editorial). British Journal of Psychiatry, 179, 283285.
Maslach, C. & Jackson, S. E. (1993) Manual of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (2nd edn). Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press.
Mears, A., Kendall, T., Katona, C., et al (2002) Career Intentions in Psychiatric Trainees and Consultants (CIPTAC). Report submitted to Department of Health. London: Royal College of Psychiatrists' Research Unit.
Pallant, J. (2001) SPSS Survival Manual. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.
Royal College of Psychiatrists (2002) Annual Census of Psychiatric Staffing 2001. Occasional Paper OP54. London: Royal College of Psychiatrists.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Consultant psychiatrists' working patterns: is a progressive approach the key to staff retention?

  • Alex Mears (a1), Sarah Pajak (a2), Tim Kendall (a2), Cornelius Katona (a3), Jibby Medina (a2), Peter Huxley (a4), Sherrill Evans and Claire Gately (a5)...
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