Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Do patients who receive electroconvulsive therapy in Scotland get better?: Results of a national audit

  • Grace Fergusson (a1), James Hendry (a2) and Chris Freeman (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

We aimed to compare the practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Scotland with the recommendations of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, to determine the characteristics of patients who receive ECT, to assess the outcome of ECT given in a routine clinical setting and to develop a system of quality assurance for ECT. Between February 1997 and March 2000, an audit of ECT measured the quality of treatment given at all clinics in Scotland. Audit tools were designed and standards set for the process, and outcome of treatment and interventions were identified to address any variance prior to each audit cycle. An electronic data collection system was developed and a website produced for the purpose of continued audit and information sharing.

Results

The annual rate of ECT in Scotland was 142 individual treatments per 100 000 of the total population. Electroconvulsive therapy was given mainly to White adult patients with a depressive illness who had consented to treatment. Clinical improvement, as measured by at least a 50% reduction in the Montgomery–Åsberg Rating Scale for Depression (MADRS) score, was evident in 71.2% of patients with a depressive episode.

Clinical Implications

The audit of ECT is achievable at a national level, ECT is effective in a routine clinical setting and the standards at ECT in Scotland are higher than the UK average.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Do patients who receive electroconvulsive therapy in Scotland get better?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Do patients who receive electroconvulsive therapy in Scotland get better?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Do patients who receive electroconvulsive therapy in Scotland get better?
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Clinical Resource Audit Group (CRAG) (1997) A Good Practice Statement on Electroconvulsive Therapy. Scottish Executive.
Duffet, R. & Lelliot, P. (1998) Auditing electroconvulsive therapy. The third cycle. British Journal of Psychiatry, 172, 401405.
Freeman, C., Hendry, J. & Fergusson, G. (2000) National Audit of Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) in Scotland. January 2000. www.sean.org
Guy, W. (1976) ECDEU Assessment Manual for Psychopharmacology. Revised DHEW Pub. (ADM). Rockville, MD: National Institute for Mental Health.
Montgomery, S. A. & Åsberg, M. (1979) A new depression scale designed to be sensitive to change. British Journal of Psychiatry, 111, 240242.
Royal College of Psychiatrists (1995) The ECT Handbook. Council report CR39. London: Royal College of Psychiatrists
Scottish ECT Audit Network (Sean). Website www.sean.org (to download full report/examples of audit tools used).
Scottish Health Statistics (1998) ISD Scotland (SMR04) C10. 2.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 20 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 25 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 19th July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Do patients who receive electroconvulsive therapy in Scotland get better?: Results of a national audit

  • Grace Fergusson (a1), James Hendry (a2) and Chris Freeman (a3)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *