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The feminisation of psychiatry: changing gender balance in the psychiatric workforce

  • Sam Wilson (a1) and John M. Eagles (a2)
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Abstract
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
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The feminisation of psychiatry: changing gender balance in the psychiatric workforce

  • Sam Wilson (a1) and John M. Eagles (a2)
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eLetters

Feminisation of psychiatry: a reality or an illusion?

Faouzi Dib Alam, SpR
18 September 2006

Wilson et al wrote on the feminisation of psychiatry (Psychiatric Bulletin, 2006). In particular it is stated that the UK Medical Careers Research Group found that women contributed 67% of doctors working in psychiatry in 1999. My experience has been different.We recently conducted a survey of consultant psychiatrists in the northwest of England, Our sample included 250 psychiatrists, and amongst them there were only 26.5 % female. When analyzing the sample further, thepercentage of recently qualified female psychiatrists is even smaller. Further more in The North West Higher Training Scheme in Psychiatry which is one of the biggest in the country, only about 30% of the trainees are female.This appears to be at odds with Wilson’s citation, thus I think it is too early to talk about so called “feminisation of psychiatry”.

With women becoming doctors in ever-increasing numbers in medicine I believe psychiatry is still crying out for female doctors to improve the well being of patients.
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Conflict of interest: None Declared

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