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From specialist registrar to consultant: permission to land?

  • Asim Naeem (a1), Joan Rutherford (a2) and Chris Kenn (a3)
Extract

After many years of hard work and training, the transition from trainee to consultant is potentially challenging. Having successfully negotiated the hurdles of preregistration training, the MRCPsych examination and the specialist registrar (SpR) interview, trainees have to pass one final signpost to mark the end of their formal training – securing their first substantive consultant psychiatrist post. Despite overall vacancy rates of about 12% for consultant psychiatrists in the UK (Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2002), competition can be intense for some posts.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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From specialist registrar to consultant: permission to land?

  • Asim Naeem (a1), Joan Rutherford (a2) and Chris Kenn (a3)
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eLetters

From Specialist Registrar to Consultant: permission to land?

Sujata Das, Specialist Registrar in General Adult & Old Age Psychiatry
20 September 2005

I read with interest Asim Naeem’s informative article (Psychiatric Bulletin, Sep 2005, 29, 348-351) providing useful tips and advice for Specialist Registrars going for their first Consultant post.

I would like to highlight an issue which needs further clarification.Dr Naeem has mentioned that Specialist Registrars can be interviewed for asubstantive consultant post during the last 3 months of their training.

However, the Department of Health in its National Health Service (Appointment of Consultants) Regulations clearly states that Specialist Registrars can explore the possibility of a consultant post as soon as it is apparent that a CCST ( Certificate of completion of Specialist Training) will be awarded in the near future and SpR’s can apply for a consultant appointment provided the expected date of award of their CCST (or recognised equivalent, if outside the UK ) falls no more than 6 months after the date of interview for the consultant post. Therefore, SpR’s are able to apply for and attend interview for Consultant posts during the last six months of their training.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH: The National Health Service (Appointment of Consultants) Regulations: Good Practice Guidance. Jan 2005

Sujata Das, Specialist Registrar in General Adult and Old Age Psychiatry,The Courtyard, ‘A’ Floor, East Block, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH.E-mail: sujatadas@doctors.org.uk
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Conflict of interest: None Declared

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From specialist registrar to consultant

Alka S Ahuja, Locum Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist
13 September 2005

I read with interest the article by Naeem et al (Psychiatric Bulletin, September 2005, 29, 348-351). I agree that acting up as a locum consultant during your higher specialist training (HST) is a useful experience. It prepares you for the ‘real world’ but whether or not itis safe and good for patients is a relevant question that is often raised.

I was recently awarded my Certificate of Completion of Specialist Training(CCST) and acted up as a locum consultant during my final year of training. I personally found the opportunity to act up gave me unrivalled experience into the role of a consultant. It made me appreciate the sheer volume of non-clinical work (administration and correspondence) involved and helped me develop an understanding of management jargon. ... More

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