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High dose neuroleptics – who gives them and why?

  • Alcuin Wilkie (a1), Neil Preston (a2) and Roger Wesby (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

Neuroleptic medication is often used in excess of the BNF maximum. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of neuroleptic dose to patient, prescriber and environmental factors, by using a cross sectional ‘snapshot’ study of psychiatric in-patient prescriptions combined with a retrospective case note survey.

Results

It was found that certain consultants prescribe higher doses of neuroleptics than others. Patients with a history of aggression had a nine and a half times higher chance of being prescribed higher doses of neuroleptics. Patients with a greater than 5-year history of neuroleptic prescription received higher doses.

Clinical Implications

High neuroleptic prescription is related more to patients' past reputation and prescriber differences than to patients' current behaviour.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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High dose neuroleptics – who gives them and why?

  • Alcuin Wilkie (a1), Neil Preston (a2) and Roger Wesby (a3)
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